Tag Archives: Fine Art

Episode LAST! Goodbye, Farewell, Adios

And… we’re out.

Some sound clips, some memories, and some great times. A long farewell tonight but it’s worth it. To all of our listeners, a heartfelt thanks from all of us. We’ve had a great time, enjoyed offering the show, but now it’s time to say goodbye.

A fond farewell to the friends of our show like Sorry for Your Luck, Liam, Grammar Nazi, Brian, Jason, Jayda, Ivan, and Ted. Our success was due, in no small part, to your input.

Oh, Brian… MARK IS A REAL PERSON!!!

See you on the next podcast, whenever (and whatever) it may be.

Cheers

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No Polarizing Images This Week

Hey everyone,

Due to some personal stuff happening in each of our lives, we just weren’t able to create a show for today. But don’t worry, we’re still growing strong and eagerly awaiting our next show in two weeks.

That topic will be about copyright and whether it’s necessary to protect our images – all three of us have differing opinions on the subject so it will be a great show.

See in you in two (and please support the show with our affiliate links!)

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Hello? Jobs, Where Are You? Episode 51

Where Have All the Jobs Gone?

There are some among us who remember the good old days where you could be a full-time photographer and making some pretty serious money. But, in light of a variety of factors, it would seem that jobs are quickly disappearing. Or, at least, jobs that paid enough to live off of. Between everyone having a camera that’s capable of compensating for mediocre skills, money-making moves by newspapers to eliminate their photojournalists, to saturated markets, etc. are there jobs to be had?

Is a job in photography as much an antiquity as old cars?It may not be as bleak an outlook as a lot of people fear.

Today we talk about the the state of the wedding photography industry, photojournalism, fine art photography, and commercial photography. We’re not in complete agreement on everything but we certainly see some bright spots.

Here’s a tip to keeping, or finding, your photography career: learn video.

No artist or photographer today as we spent a lot of time on the topic.

And, please, leave us a comment! Are you looking for a job in the industry or are you trying to figure out how to keep it? We want to hear from you!

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My Work is So Great, So Great Is My Work – Episode 50

We took a different path today and decided to look at our own work. After two years (almost) of the podcast, we thought,”what the hell” and talked about the work we have done, where we have come from, and where we think we are going.

It gets a little sugary and supportive – certainly a departure from other podcasts – but we’ll be back next time with our normal crap. But this is a really decent show and gave all three of us an opportunity to look the other guys’ work and talk about it. You can definitely see a progression in the work we’ve done and the artistic vision that we’ve developed since starting Polarizing Images back in September 2011.

Take a look at the stuff below and let us know what you think. C’mon, leave us a comment – you know you want to!

The Work of Others (Our Artists)

Lewis Hine is our photographer of the fortnight. His work for the National Child Labor Committee changed the way the US looked at the use of child labor. He has some of the most iconic works of America’s industrial age. Except, like Rob discovered, some of his most well-known work isn’t actually his. ^#%&# Internet!

FREEBIRD! Yup, Lynyrd Skynyrd (the original group) is our artist. What do we have to say about them? Listen the show, then, dammit!

 

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Fine Art Photography – Is It Still Viable?

Dear friends, you will notice three differences in today’s photography podcast:

  1. Rick is missing (he’s in Naw’lins) but we’ve got an amazing guest to fill his shoes.
  2. There’s no featured artist or photographer this week as our guest, on behalf of galleries, features all artists.
  3. 95% of the show features intelligence and well-articulated thoughts – because our guest spoke for 94.5% of the show! But don’t worry, bizarre behavior and poorly-formatted thoughts will return next episode! Continue reading »
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A Retrospect – 1+41=42, Episode 42

Looking Back

Tonight is a different show. Any fool can take a look back at earlier shows when they hit a special milestone but it takes creative and talented fools to do it when there’s no particular reason. And we are, if nothing else, creative and talented fools! So, we took the opportunity this week to do a retrospect. Continue reading »

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When Does (or Should) Your Photography Hobby Become a Profession?

Photography: You Ready to Go Pro?

Holy shit, this sucker is one long show. Two freaking hours! Anyway, this show is based on a question that Rick and I (Rob) get on a regular basis. It usually goes something like “I’ve been shooting for a while and  I get lots of positive comments on my photography and now I’d like to start charging. Am I ready?”

Ugh. Continue reading »

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Is It Real or Is It Photoshop – and Who Cares?

Why the Hell is Photoshop So Controversial?

Photoshop: it’s a tool that, for some incredibly stupid reason, seems to be controversial. Some people love it, others hate, but the smart people know that it is just that – a tool to achieve and end-result. But what got us going this week was a comment from someone on Facebook regarding a photograph they had seen, “…wow, is it real or PS?”

C’mon, really? Just because a photograph has been through the Photoshop cycle, it ceases to be real? But that got us thinking – what does it really mean for a photograph to be “real”? Too many people confuse “real” with “realism”. Are Picasso’s works not “real” paintings because they don’t depict realistic subjects? You’ll be hard-pressed to find anyone who would take such a position. So why do we say that about photography and Photoshop? If I create a shallow depth of field through a lens choice that’s okay but if I add blur in Photoshop, then it’s not a real photograph? If I make a bride’s teeth whiter than they really are or, more to the point, than they appear because we’re under incandescent lighting, that’s not a real photograph but if the bride had her teeth whitened by a dentist, that’s okay?

This whole concept of post-production, regardless of the tool that’s used, has to stop. As long as the photographer/artist is trying to achieve an image that they see in their mind’s eye, why the hell should we care – or judge – how it was achieved? And we’re not even touching on the differences between using Photoshop to manually alter an image versus allowing a camera to do it outside of our control!

So, to all of you who believe that Photoshop renders a photograph “fake”, it’s time to allow your photography and creative vision to mature a bit.

 

Artists

Photographers have done post-production long before Photoshop existed

The Surrealist Photography of Kansuke Yamamoto

What about photography before there was Photoshop? Today’s photographer is Kansuke Yamamoto (1914-1987), an early surrealist photographer from Japan. His work included several pieces on film that, today, we would accomplish with Photoshop or other digital imaging tools but, as a film photographer, Yamamoto did his post-production in the darkroom. Are these “real” photographs?

What happens when you let Tony choose the artist? You get a musician! Today we have Captain Beefheart. As long as we’re talking about art being real without requiring realism, the good captain is actually an excellent choice for an artist who inspires. Especially in the realm of surrealism. Let’s let Captain Beefheart have the last laugh today:

[pullquote]“It makes me itch to think of myself as Captain Beefheart. I don’t even have a boat.”[/pullquote]

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Photography Today, Is It Killing Off the Dinosaurs? Part 2

Photography? No, really, we do talk about it eventually! As usual, the guys take the long way around to getting on topic as we have our usual discussion about what we’re drinking, why Rick will eventually play all seven dwarfs, whether Rob or Tony has the larger breasts and, well, you know by now…

Oh, and thanks to Mr. Sadie Breeze for preventing brain damage.

Photography, Dinosaurs, and When You Won’t Change

After the last episode’s emotional tirade about whether or not the photography industry still needs a traditional sales force, things come down in this second part. Instead, we talk about whether the film shooters and even the dSLR users today are being left behind by the advances of technology. Is there still a place for traditional print portraits? Is there still room for the fine artists? How about the RAW vs JPG argument: is that argument going to be irrelevant in the near future? And what about those guys who insist on only selling prints and not providing CDs? That’s an issue we need to deal with.

Let’s face it, photography is indeed changing and, as much as we want to believe differently, we don’t have the actual answers about what will still be viable five years from now. But one thing is clear – if you’re not going to be a visionary in photography then you’ll end up a dinosaur and, historically, we now how that ends.

Artists of the Fortnight

Dennis Hopper's photographyTony points us toward the amazing photography of Dennis Hopper. Sadly, Dennis is no longer with us but his work in photography remains with us. Rob believes that actors often make great photographers because they live their lives being creative. Regardless of why, Hopper himself has a body of work that is poignant and strong. Anybody who wants to get into the fine art side of portrait photography would do well to take a good long look at Dennis Hopper’s work.

For our artist, we look at the well-known Rembrandt. If there was ever a true Renaissance Man, Rembrandt was it. Schooled in math, science, art, literature and history, Rembrandt used that learning to develop a style of portraiture known for its sharpness and, of course, it’s lighting.

Don’t forget – Our Photography Book Review

Head on over to www.PolarizingImages.com now and take part in our book discussion, The Art of Photography!

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Selling Photography – Photography Today Is Killing Off the Dinosaurs

You want disagreement and yelling? Today we look at the people who are in the business of selling photography and are dragging their feet when it comes to change. But don’t worry, it’s a self-correcting problem.

We start off right on  target until Tony asks a seemingly innocent question – does a store really need a traditional, trained sales staff? Then shit gets serious and we think Rick may have started crying. He didn’t: turns out he was just speaking into a muted mic. But before we get onto the topic about selling photography, we need to bitch and moan about why Australia just wants to fuck with you and how a shark got it right in the 1960′s. Tony also thinks a sting ray got one right a few years ago. Too soon, Tony, too soon.

Selling Photography – Do We Even Need To?

We actually intended this to be more photography-related than it ended up being, but the reason for this topic is because a large and well-established camera store in Chicago is closing its doors and the guys think it was their inability – or unwillingness – to adapt to the photography industry today. It certainly wasn’t the skill level or experience of their staff as that has always been top-notch. But the store died the death of a thousand cuts. An online presence that was virtually non-existent, major retailer for Nikon and Canon but where were the other manufacturers, a lack of related tools (no audio gear, very little video support, no computers or software…)

Selling photography in today's industry is killing off the dinosaurs

Winston Churchill by Yousef Karsh

So what is more important when selling photography: a sales team or an educational team? Tony vehemently argues for the education, Rick passionately defends sales staff with photography experience, and Rob finds himself leaning toward Camp Tony where he’d usually be the first to call bullshit!

What are your thoughts? Does selling photography today require sales staff or educators? Leave us a comment on the site, call in your thoughts, or Tweet your reaction.

Our Fortnight Artists

We even manage to have a heated argument about our photographer, Yousef Karsh. You may not know his name, but you sure as hell know his work. Famous for his portrait of Churchill (seen here), he shot a lot of historically famous and significant people – many of those shots are still the iconic image for those people.But really, who amongst us today can have such access to famous, important, and polar opposite figures? Probably no one. Maybe an era really is over.

We don’t have “an” artist today. Rather, Tony introduces us to an artists’ collective, Papunya Tula (go ahead, sing their name to Hakuna Matata, you know you want to). This is a group of Aboriginal artists whose art is as much a form of communication as it is visual beauty. Their work reminds Rob of the folding lines found in Origami.

Oh yeah, Welcome you ignorant masses!

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